May and EU agree to delay Brexit until at least April

Last night the European Union agreed to Theresa May’s request to extend Article 50 and therefore delay Brexit. Sadly the UK won’t be leaving on 29th March as the Prime Minister has promised on countless occasions.

Latest stories direct in your inbox

Sign up for the free Red Alert email:

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

EU leaders did not agree to May’s date of 30th June and instead put forward two options.

If May’s proposed deal is rejected again by MPs, then the UK can leave with No Deal on 12th April, or request a longer extension that would mean taking part in European Elections. The thought of Brits being made to vote for another set of MEPs should seriously disturb every MP in Parliament. It would represent an even bigger failure of Parliament than we’ve seen unfold thus far.

But if May’s deal is voted through, as still seems unlikely, the UK will leave on 22nd May.

With No Deal on the horizon next Friday, there were signs of EU splits for the first time on what to do next. Which rather proves that the British side should have seriously pressed leaving without a deal home to the EU far, far earlier and they would have been able to negotiate a much better deal.

Joe Barnes of Express.co.uk tweeted: “One EU diplomat has conceded the unity of the EU27 has started to disintegrate for the first time in the Brexit negotiations.”

The utterly ridiculous delay now put forward was immediately derided by Conservative MP Lucy Allan, who spoke up for millions of Brexiteers by saying: “But why do we need an extension?”

Theresa May said that she recognised the British people are tired with the process and want Brexit delivered. On 14th January in Stoke-on-Trent she said: “We’re leaving on 29th March. I’ve been clear that I don’t believe we should be extending Article 50.”

So why has she agreed to delay the UK’s EU exit despite previous pledges not to do so? Faith and trust totally shattered.

Westmonster will keep fighting for Brexit. If you appreciate what we do, please consider supporting our work. Thank you.